Team shortlist05 Sep 2016 AT 02:33 PM

TRAILERS: 6 films to see in Dubai this week

Sully, Ben Hur and Lights Out
Team shortlist05 Sep 2016 AT 02:33 PM
Sully
Sully
Morris From America
Morris From America
Ben Hur
Ben Hur
Lights Out
Lights Out

Sully (15)
Does Tom Hanks play fictional characters anymore? From Captain Phillips to James B Donovan in Bridge of Spies, Hollywood’s avuncular everyman seems to be the go-to guy for recreating real life. In Sully, he plays pilot Chesley Sullenberger, who landed his Airbus A320 into the Hudson River, New York, after he flew into a flock of geese and crippled his engines. A bit like Room, though, the great escape is only the beginning as press and investigators descend. Hanks is, of course, great in the lead role.
In cinemas from September 8

Ben Hur (15)
There are lessons that Hollywood doesn’t seem able to ever learn. Like, casting Keanu Reeves isn’t a way to recoup your investment. The biggest, though, is failing to leave classics well alone. When it was released in 1959, Ben Hur helped redefine the cinematic art, with its mega cast, widescreen shots and epic action. So what could today’s CGI-led industry add to the tale of a Roman-raised Judean imprisoned by Pontius Pilate? Not much, really. It only works if you’ve never seen so much as a frame of the original.
In cinemas from September 8

Lights Out (18)
Horror is back in vogue, it seems. James Wan, one of the people behind the Conjurings 1 and 2, has teamed up with screenwriter Eric Heisserer to co-produce this deeply eerie gem of a movie that has all the killer ingredients: a mannequin warehouse, a mother who has spent time in a mental institution, names being scratched into the floor and a ghoul who only appears when the lights go out. Grab a blanket, a torch and prepare for insomnia.
In cinemas from September 8

Morris From America (15)
One of the surprise hits from The Sundance Festival this year sees Craig Robinson (The Office, Pineapple Express, Hot Tub Time Machine) ditch the easy laughs for  a dramatic role with considerable warmth and subtlety. He plays a widower with a teenage son (played by outstanding newcomer Markees Christmas) who moves to Germany to take up a football coaching assignment, only to realise that neither fit in. Instead of giving up, they vow to make the most of their strange new environment.
In cinemas from September 8

Blood Father (15)
Such is the baggage Mel Gibson brings to a movie these days, most pre-release interviews usually revolve around his co-stars justifying why they signed up in the first place. But his comeback from “that” highway incident, which began with the low-key Beaver, continues here with this above par, well-crafted chase movie in which an ex-con trying to stay straight – wonder how he stayed in character? – rescues his daughter from a drug gang. It’s enough to think the fallen Aussie idol warrants another shot at redemption.
In cinemas now

Suicide squad (15)
The cartoonish antiheroes continue to set the zeitgeist with their madcap adventures, led by Will Smith and Margot Robbie.
In cinemas now

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